Repost: The 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women

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I am loving this entire list of the greatest albums made by women by the good folks over at NPR Music. No Doubt, Fiona Apple, Norah Jones, La Lupe… it’s like going down memory lane with so many great albums.

Here’s an excerpt of number 47 by Cuba’s Celia Cruz:

47. Celia Cruz
Son con Guaguanco(Emusica/Fania, 1966)

When Úrsula Hilaria Celia de la Caridad Cruz Alfonso sang, people stopped and listened. Alfonso, known by her stage name Celia Cruz, possessed a full-bodied voice filled with emotion and sincerity that makes you feel viscerally what she’s singing. She took Cuban music out of Cuba, out of Latin America and into the world. And she did it as a black woman in a male dominated field that valued whiteness. On her 1966 album Son con Guaguanco, she sings about daily life—about not having manteca to cook, losing her purse and being deeply in love. As women fought to be taken seriously in the workplace, Celia Cruz tirelessly put out albums and toured the world as a single woman — something many people looked down on. But she was the ultimate example of a woman carving her own path and demanding the respect she merited. Though Son con Guaguanco didn’t have much commercial success, it marks the type of music she popularized from the beginning of her career called pregón, which is a Cuban musical style based on the calls and chants of street vendors. She also popularized the Afro-Cuban sounds filled with the raucous horns and drums that comprise the basis of salsa, which became the music of Latinos in the 1970s. A true legend and superstar, and compared to Ella Fitzgerald by many in the American press for her soneos (improvisational sections of salsa songs more nuanced than jazz scats), Celia Cruz continues to be a shining example for being completely yourself. —Christina Cala (NPR Staff)

Read the whole list here.

A Look Back at this Year’s LAMC

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Mon Laferte at Central Park LAMC/SummerStage Showcase

The LAMC once again provided opportunities to network for conference go-ers and artists alike. Attendees were informed about industry trends through panels featuring representatives from Pandora, Spotify, Rogers & Cowan, NPR, Live Nation, The Orchard, Universal, Moet Hennessy, and Symphonic Distribution, among others, plus a special conversation with the legendary
Carlos Alomar and Eduardo Cabra.

Panel topics ranged from touring in the U.S. and digital music platforms to Latin music in TV and film. Additionally, our showcases around NYC featured artists like Mon Laferte, La Vida Bohème, Amaral, Los Pericos, C. Tangana, Rawayana, Princess Nokia, and Alex Anwandter at venues such as SOBs, Highline Ballroom, Central Park SummerStage, and BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! at Prospect Park.

During the Indie showcase on Thursday, A.CHAL and Jesse Baez were named this year’s “Discovery Award” recipients and received award packages from Shure, Gibson Brands, PioneerDJ, and Native Instruments joining previous Discovery alumni such as Kinky, iLe, Carla Morrison, and El Mató a Un Policía Motorizado, among others.

 

LAMC attendees were able to split their time between panels, showcases, and activations by PioneerDJ, Shure, Native Instruments, Sounds from Spain, Symphonic Distribution, and others at the Stewart Hotel in Midtown Manhattan. Also present was the now classic LAMC media floor for all of the showcasing artists – filled with many key media outlets.

My bounty from Afrolatinofest NYC

AfrolatinofestNYC, which this year paid tribute to women in the diaspora, with symposiums, film screenings, performances and more in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn, was a lovely event.

The performances by a bevy of powHERful AfroLatinx artists were beautiful and it was something to see so many happy little AfroLatino children there, looking up at stage, seeing amazing artists do their thing.

I had a very “take all my money” moment on Saturday at BedStuy’s Restoration Plaza, as I felt the vendors the organizers brought in were FANTASTIC. Simply unique & beautiful goods were on display, and all seemed very reasonably priced, too.

I wanted to give them a boost here, as sharing is caring!

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Just some of the items I purchased from vendors at NYC’s AfroLatinoFest.

Ile La Serrana, run by NYC’s Natalia Serrano, sells stationary and other goodies “for magical folks.” More info on her Facebook page.

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Notebooks by Ile La Serrana

Brooklyn Brujeria, run by Brooklyn’s Chelsea Smith (aka Chiquita Brujita), sells power prayer candles for the modern bruja!

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Candles by Chiquita Brujita

Las Ofrendas, out of San Antonio/Austin, Texas, by tk tunchez, sells “unique, organic based artisan pieces to adorn your mind, body and soul.”

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Floral crowns by Las Ofrendas.

Purple Swan by Leticia Duran of Puerto Rico, is where I got those adorable earrings featuring La Lupe. This shop aims to “challenge the normal patterns and standards of fashion designs, while guaranteeing uniqueness in design and product quality at an affordable price.”

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Wallets by Puerto Rico’s Purple Swan.

Afrolunatika, also from Puerto Rico, sells jewelry that is so empowering for women, with phrases like “Amazona,” “Guerrera,” and “Bendicida.” Their website will be ready for online orders at the end of July 2017.

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Earrings by Afrolunatika

2 X 10 are a pair who make everything by hand, hence the 10 for the number of fingers. I got a pair of beautiful tropical-colored earrings at this outfit.

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2 x 10 is still setting up their ETSY shop but check them out on IG for now!

 

A beautiful moment at a Brooklyn club…

I’m sure there are some folks who have never been to New York City who imagine that, on any given night, one can find a nightclub to hit where one can hear all kinds of global music and an inclusive environment for anyone—gay or straight, dancing along to it. But that’s not really true.

This is precisely why I became a huge fan of a monthly party called Que Bajo?! a number of years ago (2011) and attended it as much as possible. It was the one party where I could hear music from Colombia, Africa, Puerto Rico, hell, even funky beats coming out of Austin, Texas. Purely danceable stuff with guest DJs from across the United States, Europe or Latin America making a pretty diverse crowd dance all night long.

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Geko Jones and Uproot Andy, founders of Que Bajo?!

That party is now defunct but, luckily for us, its DJs are still out there working at a variety of parties. (Que Bajo?! co-founder Uproot Andy is back from touring in Brazil and will be playing in Brooklyn on Friday, July 7!)

The other founding DJ, Geko Jones, is now throwing a party called Ministerio de la Parranda. Thankfully, this party is continuing the work of providing a cool space for a diverse crowd to hear a “sancocho” of flavors from Latin America and beyond.

Here’s just 29 seconds of video from the party on June 24. In it, you’ll hear the BEAUTIFUL chords of an African guitar so often heard in Congolese soukous and Colombian champeta music. I had to stop dancing and hit record because, again, this music isn’t easily found in New York City, and I needed to share the moment, which came on New York City’s Pride weekend.

It was a beautiful moment and although I’m very sad to see Que Bajo?! go, I’m happy there are other spaces where one can enjoy such an atmosphere.

(Read my story about the new party in Sounds and Colours.)

 

‘To be happy is not to have a sky without a storm…’

The following has been attributed to Pope Francis, but as reported in La Stampa, it was not said by him at all. I’m researching the web, trying to figure out where this great advice comes from. I’ll update here if I find it. Pope Francis DID issue ten commandments for happiness, however. Here they are via Irish Central

-G

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Pope Francis wants you to be happy, but he didn’t issue the statement below.

“You can have flaws, be anxious, and ever angry, but do not forget that your life is the
greatest enterprise in the world. Only you can stop it from going bust. Many appreciate you, admire you and love you.

Remember that to be happy is not to have a sky without a storm, a road without
accidents, work without fatigue, and relationships without disappointments.

To be happy is to find strength in forgiveness, hope in battles, and security in the stage of fear, love in discord. It is not only to enjoy the smile, but also to reflect on the sadness. It is not only to celebrate the successes, but to learn lessons from the failures. It is not only to feel happy with the applause, but to be happy in anonymity.

Being happy is not a fatality of destiny, but an achievement for those who can travel within themselves.

To be happy is to stop feeling like a victim and become your destiny’s author. It is to cross deserts, yet to be able to find an oasis in the depths of our soul. It is to thank God for every morning, for the miracle of life.

Being happy is not being afraid of your own feelings. It’s to be able to talk about you. It is having the courage to hear a “No”. It is confidence in the face of criticism, even when unjustified. It is to kiss your children, pamper your parents, to live poetic moments with friends, even when they hurt us.

To be happy is to let live the creature that lives in each of us, free, joyful and simple. It is to have maturity to be able to say: “I made mistakes”. It is to have the courage to say “I am sorry”. It is to have the sensitivity to say, “I need you”. It is to have the ability to say “I love you”.

May your life become a garden of opportunities for happiness. That in spring, may it be a lover of joy. In winter, a lover of wisdom.

And when you make a mistake, start all over again. For only then will you be in love with life.

You will find that to be happy is not to have a perfect life. But use the tears to irrigate tolerance.

Use your losses to train patience. Use your mistakes to sculpt serenity. Use pain to plaster pleasure. Use obstacles to open windows of intelligence.

Never give up. Never give up on people who love you. Never give up on happiness, for life is an incredible show.”

-NOT by Pope Francis