The Bronx Zoo has a pack of wild doggos!

Roan, Apollo, Kito
Roan, Apollo, Kito

Bronx, NY – Oct. 15, 2019 – A pack of three male dhole (Cuon alpinus), a species of Asiatic wild dog, has debuted at the Bronx Zoo and can be seen in their new habitat adjacent to the Himalayan Highlands.

The three dholes are siblings that were born at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in 2016. Exhibit times may vary while the animals acclimate to their new home.

“We chose to renovate and repurpose the polar bear exhibit to create a dhole habitat that will give us the opportunity to educate and inspire our guests about an endangered species,” said Jim Breheny, WCS Executive Vice President and Director of the Bronx Zoo. “In addition to fostering an appreciation for the conservation needs of this species, this exhibit will highlight some of our work with dhole in the field.  Our long-term plans include a breeding program to contribute to the sustainability of the population in AZA (Association of Zoos & Aquariums) accredited zoos.”

Dholes are carnivores native to portions of southern and central Asia. They inhabit forests and grasslands in Bangladesh; Bhutan; Cambodia; China; India; Indonesia; Lao; Malaysia; Myanmar; Nepal; and Thailand. In the wild, they live in packs of about 12 animals, but packs of up to 40 individuals have been documented. They are social, but unlike some other wild canids, do not have a complex social hierarchy. The alpha male and female are normally the breeding pair and the rest of the pack largely consists of their offspring.

Dholes have a have fox-like appearance, with a brownish-red coat with a dark, bushy tail. In some regions, populations have distinctive white patches around the neck, chest, belly and feet. Adult dhole weigh between 25 and 45 pounds.

Dhole numbers in the wild are decreasing due to human activities, including land development resulting in habitat loss, hunting, and diseases from domestic dogs. Their wild populations are severely fragmented and they are classified as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). According to the IUCN, estimates indicate there are fewer than 2,500 adult dholes remaining in the wild.

The Wildlife Conservation Society is working in India, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Malaysia and Indonesia to protect dholes and their habitat. WCS scientists have helped identify where dholes need better protection by studying prey species. More recently, field conservationists studied dholes over an eight-year period using motion-activated field cameras, scat DNA, and tracks.

The arrival of the dhole at the Bronx Zoo will be featured in the fourth season of THE ZOO, premiering on Animal Planet in 2020.

About the Bronx Zoo: The Bronx Zoo, located on 265 acres of hardwood forest in Bronx, NY, opened on Nov. 8, 1899. It is world-renowned for its leadership in the areas of animal welfare, husbandry, veterinarian care, education, science and conservation. The zoo is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is the flagship park of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) which manages the world’s largest network of urban wildlife parks including the Bronx Zoo, Central Park Zoo, Prospect Park Zoo, Queens Zoo and New York Aquarium. Our curators and animal care staff work to save, propagate, and sustain populations of threatened and endangered species. We have educated and inspired more than 400 million visitors at our zoos and aquarium since our opening and host approximately 4 million guests at our parks each year – including about a half-million students annually. The Bronx Zoo is the largest youth employer in the borough of the Bronx, providing opportunity and helping to transform lives in one of the most under-served communities in the nation. The Bronx Zoo is the subject of THE ZOO, a docu-series aired world-wide on Animal Planet. For more information, visit www.BronxZoo.com. Members of the media should contact mpulsinelli@wcs.org (718-220-5182) or mdixon@wcs.org (347-840-1242) for more information or with questions.

BOOGIE DOWN AT THE BRONX ZOO”

Screen Shot 2018-04-20 at 10.09.57 AM.pngYou guys know I LOVE the Bronx Zoo. What could make them even cooler? Well, they’ve teamed up with legendary rappers and street artists from the Bronx for a new series, “Boogie Down at the Bronx Zoo!”

First off, there’s a song, which you can stream below. Nothing like legendary MCs rapping about zoo animals! This is wonderful for school-aged children, but I love it, too!

These events, starting on Saturday and Sunday, April 21 and 22, and continuing weekends from May 5 through June 3, will include artists and performers from a diverse representation of Bronx cultures. Think Sugar Hill Gang, breakdancing, Doo Wop music, and salsa and mambo, too! And there will be Cuban and Puerto Rican food, as well as Italian food from Arthur Avenue.

And there are great video teasers for the series. For instance, in this one, Grandmaster Caz talks about how the the Boogiedown borough inspired them. And he says the Bronx Zoo (and the Yankees) are synonymous with the borough!

Here’s a video starring Garndmaster Melle Mel:

Grandmaster Melle Mel and Scorpio of the Furious Five take the stage April 21, May 12, and May 13. You don’t want to miss it. Learn more.

Purchase tickets here.

Catch me at the Bronx Zoo this summer!

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Photo by Julie Larsen Maher / copyright WCS

Julie Larsen Maher © WCS

I go to the Bronx Zoo at LEAST once per year, but the return of these interesting guys guarantees a summer 2017 visit!

Critically endangered Indian Gharials have returned to the Bronx Zoo for the first time in 25 years.

Gharial are a slender-snouted crocodilian native to northern Indian subcontinent. They are classified as Critically Endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Eighty percent of the remaining world population live in the Chambal River in India – the last stronghold for the species.

The Gharials have been added to the river habitat in “JungleWorld,” which first opened in 1985 and is one of the marquee exhibits at the Bronx Zoo. It is an award-winning indoor Asian rainforest that features several multi-species habitats that create a total immersion experience for guests.

The “JungleWorld” river already serves as home to turtles and fish native to Asia. White-cheeked gibbons, mouse deer, Indian fruit bats, painted storks and numerous other species of birds can also be seen along the river’s edge.

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Photo by Julie Larsen Maher / copyright WCS

Julie Larsen Maher © WCS

WCS’s Bronx Zoo is open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays, 5:30 p.m. weekends from April to October; 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m all days November to March. Adult general admission is $19.95, children (3-12 years old) $12.95, children under 3 are free, seniors (65+) are $17.95. Parking is $16 for cars and $20 for buses. The Bronx Zoo is conveniently located off the Bronx River Parkway at Exit 6; by train via the #2 or #5 or by bus via the #9, #12, #19, #22, MetroNorth, or BxM11 Express Bus service (from Manhattan that stops just outside the gate.) To plan your trip, visit bronxzoo.com or call 718-367-1010.

WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) MISSION: WCS saves wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature. To achieve our mission, WCS, based at the Bronx Zoo, harnesses the power of its Global Conservation Program in nearly 60 nations and in all the world’s oceans and its five wildlife parks in New York City, visited by 4 million people annually. WCS combines its expertise in the field, zoos, and aquarium to achieve its conservation mission. Visit:newsroom.wcs.org Follow: @WCSNewsroom. For more information: 347-840-1242.

 

 

California Sea Lion Pups Born at WCS’s Bronx Zoo

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Two new pups at the Bronx Zoo! (Photo: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS)

Bronx, NY – August 19, 2016 – The WCS’s (Wildlife Conservation Society) Bronx Zoo welcomes the addition of two California sea lion pups born in June.

The pup born to mother, Indy, has been identified as a male.  Keepers have not yet been able to determine the gender of the pup born to Margaretta. Both have yet to receive their names.

Clyde is the sire of both pups. He is one of two adult bulls that came to WCS’s Queens Zoo in 2013 from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife as part of a local wildlife management project in Bonneville, Ore. These are his first offspring since arriving in New York.

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Photo by: Julie Larsen Maher © WCS

California sea lions are not endangered and live in healthy populations along the west coast of North America from Alaska to Mexico. All marine mammals, including sea lions, are protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972.

California sea lions are exhibited at all five WCS facilities: the Bronx Zoo, New York Aquarium, Central Park Zoo, Prospect Park Zoo and Queens Zoo.

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Photo by: Julie Larsen Maher © WCS

The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo is open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays, 5:30 p.m. weekends from April to October; 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.mNovember to March. Adult admission is $19.95, children (3-12 years old) $12.95, children under 3 are free, seniors (65+) are $17.95. Parking is $16 for cars and $20 for buses. TheBronx Zoo is conveniently located off the Bronx River Parkway at Exit 6; by train via the #2 or #5 or by bus via the #9, #12, #19, #22, MetroNorth, or BxM11 Express Bus service (from Manhattan that stops just outside the gate.) To plan your trip, visit bronxzoo.com or call 718-367-1010.

The Bronx Zoo saved a cobra!

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Photo via Julie Larsen Maher

Via WCS: Two Bronx Zoo herpetologists rescued an Indian cobra (Naja naja) which was a stow away on a container ship destined for the APM Terminals at the Elizabeth-Port Authority Marine Terminal in New Jersey.

The approximately 18-inch long snake was found in poor condition, dehydrated, cold and exposed to oil residue in one of the cargo holds of the MV Maersk Sana.

The cobra, which is a protected species, was taken to the Bronx Zoo where it is being treated by veterinarians. The snake’s condition has improved since its arrival at the zoo.

Said Kevin Torregrosa, one of the two Bronx Zoo staffers who rescued the animal, “When we located the snake deep below the deck of the container ship, it was in very poor condition. We are cautiously optimistic regarding its recovery.”

The ship was heading from Singapore to the United States when the crew discovered the cobra in the hold on Dec. 10th.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contacted the Bronx Zoo on Monday, Dec. 14 to help remove the cobra from the ship when it reached its New Jersey destination.

Torregrosa responded to the request for help along with fellow herpetologist Avi Shuter.

Once the ship docked, Torregrosa and Shuter, equipped with snake tongs and hooks, a snake bag, headlamps, and antivenin, boarded the vessel, descended eight stories below the deck, and began their search where the highly venomous snake was last seen by the crew.

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Looks SERIOUS. Photo: Julie Larsen Maher

It took approximately half an hour to locate the cobra and it was placed in a snake bag, hoisted back to the deck and brought to the Bronx Zoo. Torregrosa estimates the cobra is about one year old, and its sex is unknown at this time.

The Indian cobra’s native range is Southern Asia, including in India, Pakistan, Bhutan, Nepal and Sri Lanka. It can be found in urbanized and rural areas, as it preys on rodents.

“We have not yet determined if the cobra will remain at the zoo permanently” said Jim Breheny, Bronx Zoo Director and WCS Executive Vice President of the Zoos and Aquarium. “At present, the snake is in quarantine and under treatment at our wildlife health center. Our main concern is to restore it to good health. We were happy to assist the ship’s crew and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service with this rescue.”

The Bronx Zoo is occasionally called upon by local and federal agencies to assist in situations with exotic wildlife due to the expertise of its staff.

 

BABY. PORCUPINE.

SQUEEEEEE!!

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Photos by Julie Larsen Maher © Wildlife Conservation Society

Julie Larsen Maher_1646_North American Porcupine Porcupette_CZ _BZ_08 07 15A baby North American porcupine was born at WCS’s (Wildlife Conservation Society) Bronx Zoo and is on exhibit with its family in the newly renovated Children’s Zoo.

The young male porcupine was born on July 28 to mother, Alice, and father, Patrick. This is the pair’s third offspring.

The porcupine’s most recognizable physical characteristic is its spiky quills. They can have as many as 30,000 quills covering their bodies and use them as a defense against predators. Despite popular belief, porcupines cannot shoot their quills. The quills of the North American porcupine have a tiny barb on the tip that, when hooked in flesh, pull the quill from the porcupine’s skin and painfully imbed it in a predator’s face, paws or body.

At birth, the quills are very soft. They begin to harden a few hours after birth and continue to harden and grow as the baby matures.

Young porcupines begin eating solid food as early as three weeks old, but will continue to nurse for about three months.

For more information or to speak with a WCS expert, contact Max Pulsinelli at 718-220-5182 or mpulsinelli@wcs.org.

Joel Osteen Ministries Teams up With Hundreds of Teens in Bronx, NY for Generation Hope Project®

The NYC area 'Night of Hope' is on Sat. June 7.
The NYC area ‘Night of Hope’ is on Sat. June 7.

I am NOT the type to post inspirational quotes on social media by the Dalai Lama, Joel Osteen, or even Bill Gates. (Ha.) But I will share this cool news (the part about 250 underprivileged kids) coming out of the Osteen camp because this is what it’s all about, in my opinion — spreading love by helping out! That, in itself, is inspiring; no quotes needed. Thanks to the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Press Office for sharing this bit of news.

❤ –Gina

BRONX, N.Y. — On Thursday June 5, Victoria Osteen along with volunteers from The Generation Hope Project®, will take 250 underprivileged children to the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo as a part of the activities surrounding this year’s “America’s Night of Hope,” at Yankee Stadium.

The third annual Generation Hope Project® will focus on mentoring—developing one-to-one relationships with young people who need strong role models. Volunteers will have an opportunity to share time with middle school children who might not normally get the chance to join in on the full zoo experience.

Generation Hope Project® will also work with organizations around the Bronx community on service projects including.

  • WCS’s Bronx Zoo – Volunteers will mentor and take 250 underserved middle-school age children to the zoo.
  • NYC Food Bank in Hunts Point – Packing food boxes to distribute in the community.
  • Community Kitchen & Food Pantry in Harlem – Stocking pantry shelves and food prep.
  • Green Pastures Baptist Church – Major cleanup of Hurricane Sandy damage, organization and rehabilitation of facility.
  • Bronx Christian Fellowship Church – Major cleanup and organization of warehouse, sorting donations, cleaning outside bays and church repair.
  • Latino Pastoral Action Center – Major cleanup of classrooms, painting, donation sorting, participating in children’s school activities.
  • Yankee Stadium Mentoring Baseball Game – Volunteers will accompany mentees and mentors to the game to highlight them and the programs in pre-game activities.

Generation Hope Project® is an outreach of Joel Osteen Ministries that engages young adults from around the country and around the world in service to communities in need. Through partnerships with local leaders, organizations, and other churches, GenHope has provided close to 3,000 hours of volunteer service, reaching thousands through its social media messages and bringing supplies and support to those in need. Learn more at www.generationhopeproject.com.

America’s Night of Hope will be held at Yankee Stadium on June 7, 2014 at 7pm. The event, which coincides with the volunteer projects, will draw more than 55,000 from across the nation for an evening of hope and celebration. This year marks the 6th annual event. The first was held at Yankee Stadium in 2009, then Dodger Stadium, US Cellular Field, Nationals Park, and Marlins Stadium in 2013.  For more information, go to www.joelosteen.com.

Joel and Victoria Osteen are the pastors of Lakewood Church in Houston, Texas-America’s largest church with more than 52,000 weekly attendees and one of the nation’s most racially and socioeconomically diverse. Joel’s weekly television program reaches more than 10 million households each week in the US and is seen by millions more in over 100 nations across the globe.

 

Stop what you’re doing because: LION CUBS at the Bronx Zoo

 

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Bronx, NY – May 1, 2014 – The lion cubs are out and about at the Bronx Zoo!

They debuted last fall and were announced by Bronx Zoo Director Jim Breheny via Twitter (@jimbreheny).

 

Born on Aug. 16, the litter is comprised of three males, Thulani, Ime, and Bahati, and one female, Amara. Their mother is Sukari (9 years old) and father is M’wasi (11 years old).  This is Sukari and M’wasi’s third litter.

 

Lions live in grasslands and open woodlands across much of sub-Saharan Africa, and the Bronx Zoo’s African Plains exhibit is a representation of the East African savannah. One of the most popular exhibits at the zoo, the African Plains opened in 1941 to record crowds and was the first zoo exhibit in North America to showcase African wildlife in a predator/prey setting, with the lions separated from their prey by a moat.

 

The Bronx Zoo breeds lions as part of the Species Survival Plan, a cooperative propagation program designed to enhance the genetic viability of animal populations in zoos accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.

 

In nature, lion populations are drastically declining and African lions are designated as Threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Info via Wildlife Conservation Society.