New music: J Hacha De Zola’s ‘Strange’

 

I met musician and artist J Hacha De Zola in October during Jersey City’s Art and Studio Tour (#JCAST) because I was intrigued by his snappy dressing and asked if I could take his picture for my Instagram. I’ve been following his music ever since.

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J Hacha de Zola

He’s set to release his album Escape From Fat Cat City on Jan. 8, but has released a couple of tracks in the meantime for our listening pleasure.

Grab a free download and stream of new track “Strange” (yes, I thought of ‘People are Strange’ because I get some Jim Morrison vibes, idc idc) via Magnet, which calls the song “a moaning, drama-filled showstopper complete with xylophone solos.”

Our friends at CMJ premiered “Let it Go” (no, nothing to do with that Disney movie) in late November.

“… way in the back yelling and way in your face horn blurts toss you back and forth, with Hacha De Zola reigning it all in then letting it splay out again,” is how they describe it, and we tend to agree. Check out the video for “Let it Go” below. I won’t spoil it for you, but there are children’s party characters (?) in the story. And keep up with all things J Hacha De Zola on Twitter.

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Why are people using the word ‘ratchet?’

s_sadeghi_slang_500x279Ratchet. What does it mean?

According to Dictionary.com:
/ˈraCHit/ Noun
A device consisting of a bar or wheel with a set of angled teeth in which a pawl, cog, or tooth engages, allowing motion in one direction…

Here’s how popular slang lexicon Urban Dictionary defines it:
ratchet: adj. a term for someone who is either 1. a whore 2. dirty/nasty 3. ghetto as HELL 4. being annoying 5. busted

How did the urban community come to adopt this word and why?

This weekend on WFUV‘s Fordham Conversations, Robin Shannon talks with Fordham University student Julianny Gomez and Dr. Aimee Cox, an assistant professor of African American Studies, about the popular slang term.

Julianny’s research examines how the derogatory term has been adopted as a way for young African Americans to police, embarrass and degrade one another.

Tune in to 90.7 FM on Saturday, June 8, at 7 a.m., or listen online here.