Hell Hath No Fury Like A Man Rejected

Image via http://www.pipubs.com/
Image via http://www.pipubs.com/

Re-post from Lindsay Brooke Davis’ blog:

Good afternoon, friends! 

Oh, what a day it’s been so far. Some of you follow me on Facebook and may recall an update about a man who Googled me on his iPad while we were on his second date, found some footage of me reporting from SXSW and proceeded to google the model/presenter who set up the segment so we can look at her in a bikini. 

This inspired me to finally create a web series I had been thinking about for over a year called Bad Dates in the City, currently in pre-production! #LBDinNYCProds @BadDates 

After I decided I had no interest in seeing this man again, I ignored his three texts “Did you take the bus home? “How’s it going?” and “Hello”) which came over a span of a week and a half until I opted to text him back this morning to the polite tune of, “Thanks for the other night and it was nice meeting you, but don’t wish to chat further. Thanks and good luck! Best, Lindsay” 

Well, here is how this Ivy league grad with an MBA that I met on JDate responded:

Read the rest here

New music video: Somos Mujeres, Somos Hip-Hop

I wish I had more information to share about this video because it’s bad ass. If features a bevy of Latina rappers who I assume hail from Ecuador (they flash the flag a couple of times in the video) spitting some thoughtful lyrics about women, femininity, the barrios they are from, resistance, activism, and more.

Watch below. (And shout out to the girl who comes in at 3:53. She can spit!)

BodyVOX! at Fordham

BodyVOXFordham University professor Aimee Lee Cox has organized an amazing program for young women!

BodyVOX is a performance activist piece that confronts the sexualization of girls, and represents a unique collaboration between students in her African American Studies class, theater majors, the viBe Theater Experience, and the national organization, SPARK Movement.

The original dance-theater-activist performance is written and performed collaboratively by young women. BodyVOX! explores the curvy lines between “sexy” and “sexualized,” and demands that we not just critique the media messages forcefed to girls but that we take action and ignite change.

Created in an express 4-week process, an intergenerational team of artists, dancers, writers, activists and performers use performance to share our creative strategies to end the sexualization of girls, a root cause of violence against women and girls.

Sunday May 12 at 7pm
Monday May 13 at 7pm
at the Veronica Lally Kehoe Studio Theatre
Fordham College at Lincoln Center
113 West 60th Street (at Columbus Ave.)
A,C,B,D,1 trains to Columbus Ave

*Special lobby installation created by FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture

FREE!

BodyVOX! is written & performed by: Amee, Courtney, Erica, Nicosie, Mia, Mia, Quien, Stephanie & Tanzina, with Emma, Nadia and Aja & the SPARKteam.

Directed by: Aimee Cox & Dana Edellis, BodyVOX! is a collaboration between The Department of African and African American Studies and the Theatre Program at Fordham University, viBe Theater Experience, and SPARK Movement.

Have you ever met a MALE feminist?

url -1When was the last time that an artist put out music for women?

I’m talking about songs with lyrics that are in no way degrading to or focused on sexualizing a woman, but a series of songs that touches on issues that affect women today.

New York City’s revolutionary rockers, OUTERNATIONAL, created a buzz in 2009 with their anti-war anthem ‘Sir, No Sir,’ a protest to Obama’s troop surge in Afghanistan.  In 2012, they gained acclaim for ‘Todos Somos Ilegales: We Are All Illegals‘, the bilingual concept album set on the US-Mexico border (with collaborators: Tom Morello of Rage Against The Machine, Chad Smith of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Residente of Puerto Rican super group, Calle 13).

Valentine’s Day 2013 and they’re taking it a step further.

They are releasing an EP in conjunction with One Billion Rising..

The V-Day event’s goal is to end violence against women and girls around the world, and the cause is backed a multitude of artists.

“We are releasing the Here is The Rose EP right now, in time for One Billion Rising and International Women’s Day, because right now millions of people, and millions of women in particular are speaking and acting out against their daily oppression – patriarchy, rape culture, sexual objectification and dehumanization,” said Outernational guitarist Leo Mintek.

Listen to the first single of the EP, “Here is the Rose,” at Paste. And download it. It’s free in honor of One Billion Rising!

WSJ: How a Night Out in Delhi Turned Tragic

Protesters in India. (Image via National Post)
Protesters in India. (Image via National Post)

A Woman Determined to Improve Her Position in Life Became a Victim of a Brutal Attack; Alleged Culprits on ‘Joy Ride’

By AMOL SHARMAKRISHNA POKHAREL and VIBHUTI AGARWAL
Wall Street Journal

NEW DELHI—On the evening of Dec. 16, a young female physiotherapy student went to a movie with a male friend. After, they waited at a bus stop on a busy road in a south Delhi neighborhood called Munirka.

They were, in many ways, the face of a youthful, up-and-coming India. She was 23 years old, from a lower-caste rural family, according to news reports. She was a role model in her neighborhood, reports said, engrossed in her studies in the northern city of Dehradun, paying tuition with money raised when her parents sold their land.

“She wanted to ensure that she studied well, stood on her own feet and made it big in life so she could ensure a better future for her family,” a friend told the Sunday Express.

Her companion on Dec. 16 was a 28-year-old software engineer at a local technology company. The two victims’ names haven’t been disclosed by authorities.

The same evening, not far away, a much different side of youthful India was on display. Two brothers—Ram and Mukesh Singh—cooked some chicken at their home in a slum called Ravi Dass Camp, a maze of narrow lanes and open drains. Neighbors describe the brothers as rowdy, heavy drinkers.

The brothers decided, with four friends, to take a “joy ride” in the bus that Ram Singh drove for a living, according to police statements. None of the six, who are all in custody, nor their lawyers could be reached for comment.

A little after 9 p.m., the bus pulled in at the stop where the couple waited, police say. They were the only ones to board, paying a fare of about 20 rupees, or 35 cents, according to police. Thus began an encounter so gruesome that it shocked the nation and, ultimately, took a life.

As the bus set off, three of the men who were seated in the driver’s cabin started harassing the two passengers, police say. When the software engineer tried to resist, the men started beating him on his legs, arms and head, according to police.

The woman tried to intervene to protect her friend. The men dragged her to the rear of the bus and raped her as they drove around south Delhi for an hour, police say.

Read more in this Dec. 3- story in Wall Street Journal.