Happy Black History Month

I know, that the shortest month of the year is devoted to honoring black Americans is a disgrace, but being that it is Black History Month, I wanted to share some of the awesome work by faculty from Fordham’s African American History department:

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The archive, made available through the Department of African and African-American Studies and Fordham Libraries, consists of downloadable audio files and verbatim transcripts of interviews conducted by researchers from 2002 to 2013.

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  • It wasn’t enough for Aimee Cox, Ph.D., to volunteer at a homeless shelter in Detroit, where she took notes for her research on how teenage girls there were coping with a broken system.

Cox, an assistant professor African and African American studies, ended up becoming the shelter’s director while she was still working on her doctorate at the University of Michigan.

Her shelter experiences are now documented in Shapeshifters: Black Girls and the Choreography of Citizenship (2015, Duke University Press).

Watch a clip of Dr. Cox on the Melissa Harris-Perry show on MSNBC here.

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  • Christina Greer‘s research and teaching focus on American politics, black ethnic politics, urban politics, immigration, quantitative methods, Congress, city and state politics, campaigns and elections, and public opinion.

Dr. Greer was named to City & State’s Class of 2014 “40 Under 40 Rising Stars” list. Her book, Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford, 2013), was awarded the National Conference of Black Political Scientists’ 2014 W.E.B. Du Bois Distinguished Book Award, and her next book will recount the history of African-Americans running for president.

View video of Dr. Greer’s appearance on MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry Show talking national politics, race, and voter identification cards.

 

 

Two great #race and #gender related events in #NYC: November 2014

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 2.32.27 PMTwo great #race related events this weekend in New York City:

The first is happening online: STAY WOKE

To speak to events in Ferguson, MO, and the many counts of racialized violence in America, Stay Woke: Write Yourself will gather together artists from the greater community and Fordham students and faculty to create meaningful action through art. It is also a story space for testimonials of racial harmony and violence online. More info here.

The second is an event at the Brooklyn Museum on Saturday, Nov. 14, at 2 p.m.: Beyond Binaries and Boxes: Deconstructing and Re-envisioning Black Feminism(s). You’ll also be able to watch online.

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 2.40.17 PMFor this event, panelists will ask the audience to reframe and re-envision black feminism(s) to include creativity, abundance, and collective liberation in the twenty-first century. Panelists include Fordham University professor, Aimee Meredith Cox, from the department of African and African American Studies. Cox is the author of Shapeshifters: Black Girls and the Choreography of Citizenship, to be published by Duke University Press next year.

It will also include my friend, community food and environment activist, Tanya Fields.

Others include: Florence Noel, Northeast Director of Girls Who Code; Jamilah Lemieux, Journalist and Editor of Ebony.com; and Aiesha Turman, Executive Director of Black Girl Project.